Map of Augustan Rome - created by AML for the publication "Mapping Augustan Rome" and later used for the Digital Augustan Rome project
Map of Augustan Rome - created by AML for the publication "Mapping Augustan Rome" and later used for the Digital Augustan Rome project
Detailed study of the existing and proposed resources surrounding Mt. Lykaion - map created by AML
Detailed study of the existing and proposed resources surrounding Mt. Lykaion - map created by AML
Students and scholars excavating and surveying on the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project
Students and scholars excavating and surveying on the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project
A scenic view of a mountain range in the Parrhasian Heritage Park
A scenic view of a mountain range in the Parrhasian Heritage Park
Boundary map of the Parrhasian Heritage Park - map created by AML
Boundary map of the Parrhasian Heritage Park - map created by AML
Examples of the various scientific techniques used at the AML and in the field
Examples of the various scientific techniques used at the AML and in the field

Archaeological Mapping Lab

The University of Arizona

Leadership

Dr. David Gilman Romano , Dr. Nicholas L. Stapp , Mark Davison & Ximena Valle

School of Anthropology Haury Anthropology Building, Room 408A
1009 East South Campus Drive, P.O.Box 210030

Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-5343

The Archaeological Mapping Lab is an outgrowth of a long term interest in the study of the planning of ancient cities and sanctuaries that has been underway for the past twenty years in the Mediterranean Section of the Penn Museum.

Originally established at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology by Dr. David Gilman Romano, the Lab has relocated to its new home at the School of Anthropology, University of Arizona. The move occurred on January 1, 2012.

The Lab was originally created with the purpose of studying the city and landscape of Roman Corinth, the work of the lab combined the field work skills of computerized architectural survey with digital cartography, remote sensing and GIS in order to document and quantify the component buildings, monuments and landscape of an ancient Roman city.

By digitizing and geo-referencing the actual-state drawings of every building, monument and structure it has been possible to put together a digital interactive actual-state drawing of the entire excavated city of Corinth in which every line of every building and monument is coded with four bits of information: chronology, function, material and bibliography.

The skills learned in the study of Corinth formed the foundation for many of the Labs current projects, including a detailed study of Augustan Rome, a comprehensive survey and excavation of the Sanctuary of Zeus at Mt. Lykaion in Arcadia and more recently the creation of the Parrhasian Heritage Park, Greece's first national park. The Lab pursues many projects which tie traditional research methods with field work and emerging technologies in analysis and visualization to produce a new approach to educating students, working with colleagues and publishing the findings of the research conducted in the Lab.

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